October 12

We’re changing the way we do labs, starting October 12. We’ll have all of our previous labs available for each lab session. So going forward, just sign up for a time slot and pick whichever lab you’d like when you arrive.

Update 10/11 2:14 p.m.: We’ve moved the labs to 1009 Mechanical Engineering Lab, which has twice the capacity. I’ve re-opened registration.

For the October 12 sessions, we’ll have the following labs available:

  • AWS 101: Introduction to EC2
  • Identity and Access Management
  • S3 and CloudFront for content distribution
  • Relational Database Service
  • Automating AWS with CloudFormation
  • Introduction to Lambda
  • Building clusters with Alces Flight
  • Elastic MapReduce

Want another topic? Let us know: aws-support@illinois.edu


Our October 12 labs will be held in room 1009 of the Mechanical Engineering Lab. Please register to reserve your spot. Computers in the lab will be available for use, or you may bring a laptop if you prefer.

September 28

Elastic MapReduce (Lab, 10:00 – 12:00)

Try out Amazon Elastic MapReduce (EMR), Amazon’s hosted and managed Hadoop service. EMR is a fast and easy way to jump into big data analysis.

AWS 101 (Lab, 3:00 – 4:30)

Walk through the basics of Amazon’s Elastic Computer Cluster (EC2). Launch and configure a basic web server, and if you have time, make another one and cluster them behind an Elastic Load Balancer (ELB) to create a high-availability website.


Our September 28 labs will be held in room 1009 of the Mechanical Engineering Lab (which is different from the Mechanical Engineering Building). Please register to reserve your spot. Computers in the lab will be available for use, or you may bring a laptop if you prefer.

September 14

Time for some HPC! We’ll be introducing Alces Flight and demonstrating how simple it can be to build a computation cluster on AWS.

AWS 101 (Lab, 9:00 – 10:30)

Learn the basics of the AWS web console. You will create a simple webserver on EC2. If there’s time, you can clone it, add an Elastic Load Balancer, and create a highly-available web server cluster.

Update: 9/12 The AWS 101 Lab is full, and has been removed from the signup form. We’ve added another section in the afternoon.

Building Clusters with Alces Flight (Lab, 10:30 – 12:00)

Alces Flight is billed as “Effortless HPC on Demand.” It’s a tool for cluster management which supports hundreds of scientific computing tools. Each lab participant will build their own personal HPC cluster, see how its used, and tear it back down.

AWS 101 (Lab, 3:00 – 4:30)

Since the morning session filled up, we’ve added a second session of AWS 101. It’s the same content: deploying an EC2 instance with a webserver and adding an Elastic Load Balancer if time permits.


Our September 14 labs will be held in room 1009 of the Mechanical Engineering Lab. Please register to reserve your spot. Computers in the lab will be available for use, or you may bring a laptop if you prefer.

 

August 24

This week, we’ll be diving into Amazon Lambda, which is probably my favorite Amazon service. Lambda runs code on demand and charges for run time. All previous hosting models charged for capacity and availability. Since Lambda includes high availability and massive scalability from the start, it has the potential to dramatically speed up applications and reduce costs.

All labs will be held in room 1009 of the Mechanical Engineering Lab. Please register to reserve your spot. Computers in the lab will be available for use, or you may bring a laptop if you prefer.

Please email aws-support@illinois.edu if you have any questions or suggestions for future topics.

Web Hosting with S3 and CloudFront (Lab, 9:00 – 10:00)

This lab will walk you through hosting a simple static web site on S3, delivered through CloudFront, Amazon’s global content delivery network. This is a great way to offload delivery of static assets (images, scripts, style sheets) from your web server while speeding up page loads and lowering costs.

AWS Lambda Introduction (Lab, 10:00 – 11:30)

Building on S3 and CloudFront as a content delivery system, this lab will demonstrate how to trigger a Lambda function to generate a thumbnail automatically when a new image object is uploaded to S3.

August 10

We’re hosting another training day on Wednesday, August 10. This week’s labs are all repeats from previous sessions for those who have had scheduling conflicts.

All labs will be held in room 1009 of the Mechanical Engineering Lab. Please register to reserve your spot. Computers in the lab will be available for use, or you may bring a laptop if you prefer.

Please email aws-support@illinois.edu if you have any questions or suggestions for future topics.

Web Hosting with S3 and CloudFront (Lab, 9:00 – 10:00)

This lab will walk you through hosting a simple static web site on S3, delivered through CloudFront, Amazon’s global content delivery network. This is a great way to offload delivery of static assets (images, scripts, style sheets) from your web server while speeding up page loads and lowering costs.

Automating AWS (Lab, 10:00 – 12:00)

Use AWS CloudFormation to build a service, then tear it down and recreate the whole thing with one click. Automation is key to zero-downtime software updates, scalability, and disaster planning, and I recommend this as a course to anyone interested in maximizing uptime, building clusters, or scaling your service on demand.

AWS 101 (Lab, 1:30 – 3:30)

Learn the basics of the AWS web console. You will create an EC2 instance and make it work as a webserver. If there’s time, you can clone it, add an Elastic Load Balancer, and create a highly-available web server cluster.

 

July 27

Our next Amazon training day is Wednesday, July 27.

All labs will be held in room 1009 of the Mechanical Engineering Lab. Please register to reserve your spot. Computers in the lab will be available for use, or you may bring a laptop if you prefer.

Please email aws-support@illinois.edu if you have any questions or suggestions for future topics.

AWS 101 (Lab, 9:30 – 11:30)

Learn the basics of the AWS web console. You will create an EC2 instance and make it work as a webserver. If there’s time, you can clone it, add an Elastic Load Balancer, and create a highly-available web server cluster.

This is a repeat of the AWS 101 lab we’ve run in previous weeks. No previous knowledge of AWS is required.

AWS RDS (Lab, 1:00 – 2:30)

Try out Amazon’s Relational Database Service. RDS is one of the most immediately useful Platform-as-a-Service (PaaS) offerings in Amazon’s catalog. It doesn’t require patching, monitoring, or backup management from our local staff, so it can quickly reduce the effort required to run our services.

Automating AWS (Lab, 2:45 – 4:15)

Use AWS CloudFormation to build a service, then tear it down and recreate the whole thing with one click. Automation is key to zero-downtime software updates, scalability, and disaster planning, and I recommend this as a course to anyone interested in maximizing uptime, building clusters, or scaling your service on demand.

 

July 13

We’re going to be hosting another AWS training day next Wednesday, July 13. We’re planning for three hands-on lab sessions and some open office hours.

All labs will be held in room 1009 of the Mechanical Engineering Lab. Please register to reserve your spot. Computers in the lab will be available for use, or you may bring a laptop if you prefer.

AWS 101 Lab (9:00 – 10:30)

Learn the basics of the AWS web console. You will create an EC2 instance and make it work as a webserver. If there’s time, you can clone it, add an Elastic Load Balancer, and create a highly-available web server cluster.

AWS IAM Lab (10:45 – 12:15)

Walk through the functionality of AWS Identity and Access Management. This is specifically recommended for IT Pros supporting customers using AWS.

Web Hosting on AWS Lab (1:15 – 2:45)

How to use tools like S3 and CloudFront to offload traffic from existing servers to enhance your user experience and simplify operations.

Office Hours (3:00 – 4:30)

Bring us any questions you have about the service: account logistics, cloud platform selection, implementation challenges, business topics.

If you have suggestions for future sessions, please email us: aws-support@illinois.edu

Lab Costs

We ran two AWS 101 labs today, with 19 total participants. The lab guided users through launching two web servers with SSD storage and using an Elastic Load Balancer to direct HTTP traffic to the highly-available cluster.

I checked our bill after the labs concluded:

$4.01

$4.01 comes out to just over twenty cents per participant. I feel like that’s not too bad.

AWSome Day for IT

This Wednesday (June 8) will kick off our 2016 AWS training schedule, with an AWSome day for IT pros.

Time Session Location
9:00-10:30 AWS 101 Hands-On Lab 1009 Mechanical Engineering Lab
10:45-11:45 Open discussion: requesting and accessing an account, use cases, AWS best practices and solutions L410 Digital Computer Lab
1:00-2:30 AWS 101 Hands-On Lab 1009 Mechanical Engineering Lab

The two lab sessions will be the same. We’re offering two times to serve more people and provide scheduling flexibility. We Each lab sessions can accommodate 40 participants. Please register in advance to guarantee a seat.

AWS staff will be available in the late afternoon to provide one-on-one assistance. Please email aws-support@illinois.edu if you’d like to schedule some time.